Homecoming

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens:” -Ecclesiastes 3:1

I stayed in bed too long this morning. My husband, who normally gets up at four forty-five was sick and slept in. As we woke to the smell of last night’s Vicks, I was consciously aware of my son’s early rise. He said he’d been up since three. “Wow”, I thought, “You are going to be a doozy later.” My daughter came to breakfast with her begging look, asking if I would check her out of junior high so she could go watch my son, escort his girlfriend in the Winter Homecoming Assembly at the high school. We prayed the Lord’s Prayer together, sat and ate a bowel of cereal with half a grapefruit, before heading out the door to carpool, homecoming practice, and work.

After dropping off my girl and her best friend to the band room, I headed out to complete a couple of errands. My eyes were tired even though the day had just started and I realized I was going to cut it close with getting to the school assembly; so I dropped my last errand. Heading back to the junior high, I  grabbed my daughter and then drove on to the high school.

As we entered the gym there was a sea of momma’s taking photos of the Homecoming Court with their sons and daughters. For a moment, I thought, “Did I fail to do the “correct mom thing” and bring my really big nice camera for the photo shoot?” Then I remembered, I don’t own a really big nice camera.  I felt strangely out of place. Like I was the awkward one in  high school, once again failing to make the popularity cut. Thankfully, I had my daughter with me. I looked at her and replied, “I don’t do society well”. She smiled and nudged me into the seats being graciously saved for us by my son’s girlfriend’s mom.

The choir was practicing in the back ground when I looked up and saw him. There he was singing with his friends in choir with his beautiful girlfriend dressed for the homecoming event. His bowtie was silver, his hair was wild with blondish brown curls, and his confidence showed he was in his element. A tear ran down my cheek. “In his element,” I thought. What a contrast. I looked at my daughter who was giving me the “comfort eyes” when she saw my tear fall. I said, “I hated high school. I always felt so uncomfortable and timid.”  We laughed at the unexpected moment of honesty and insecurity. Then to console myself I said, “But I loved college.”

The assembly began, with the introduction of each homecoming maid being escorted by their dates. My daughter and I quietly discussed the dresses and enjoyed the moment. The choir sang. I got to watch my son play his bass guitar. As I looked out over the crowd of students in the gymnasium, I remembered being in their seats always wondering what it would be like to be the one on the floor getting the attention. Then I smiled. Truthfully that memory didn’t matter anymore. Life was so rich with blessing now. God gifts I could have never dreamed about when I was younger; as a teen I saw only in the present. Now, reflecting back, my life was exactly how it needed to be for me to become who I am. The woman enjoying this beautiful moment watching her child participate in his high school years. And that made me smile proudly. …and shed another tear; to which my daughter, replied, “Oh, Mom, you’re so sentimental.” To which, I answered, “Yes, I am…and so very thankful.”

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